Observational Study
Copyright ©The Author(s) 2023. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.
World J Gastroenterol. Oct 21, 2023; 29(39): 5494-5502
Published online Oct 21, 2023. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v29.i39.5494
Risk assessment of venous thromboembolism in inflammatory bowel disease by inherited risk in a population-based incident cohort
Andrew S Rifkin, Zhuqing Shi, Jun Wei, Siqun Lilly Zheng, Brian T Helfand, Jonathan S Cordova, Vincent F Biank, Alfonso J Tafur, Omar Khan, Jianfeng Xu
Andrew S Rifkin, Zhuqing Shi, Jun Wei, Siqun Lilly Zheng, Brian T Helfand, Jianfeng Xu, Program for Personalized Cancer Care, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL 60201, United States
Brian T Helfand, Jianfeng Xu, Department of Surgery, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL 60201, United States
Brian T Helfand, Jianfeng Xu, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, United States
Jonathan S Cordova, Vincent F Biank, Department of Pediatrics, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL 60201, United States
Alfonso J Tafur, Cardiovascular Institute, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL 60201, United States
Omar Khan, Department of Medicine, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL 60201, United States
Author contributions: Xu J contributed to the concept and design; Shi Z, and Wei J performed the data analysis; Rifkin AS, and Xu J drafted the manuscript; Rifkin AS, Shi Z, Wei J, Zheng SL, Helfand BT, Cordova JS, Biank VF, Tafur AJ, Khan O, and Xu J contributed to the critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content; Xu J performed the supervision.
Institutional review board statement: The UK Biobank was approved by North West-Haydock Research Ethics Committee (REC reference: 16/NW/0274; IRAS project ID: 200778).
Informed consent statement: Data from the UK Biobank was accessed through a Material Transfer Agreement under Application Reference Number: 50295. This study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.
Conflict-of-interest statement: NorthShore University HealthSystem has an agreement with GoPath Laboratories and GenomicMD for genetic tests of polygenic risk score.
Data sharing statement: The data used in this study is available in the UK Biobank, a publicly available repository. Data was accessed through a Material Transfer Agreement under Application Reference Number: 50295. For additional information, please feel free to contact the corresponding author, Jianfeng Xu, DrPH.
STROBE statement: The authors have read the STROBE Statement—checklist of items, and the manuscript was prepared and revised according to the STROBE Statement—checklist of items.
Open-Access: This article is an open-access article that was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: https://creativecommons.org/Licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Corresponding author: Jianfeng Xu, MD, DrPH, Professor, Program for Personalized Cancer Care, NorthShore University HealthSystem, 1001 University Place, Evanston, IL 60201, United States. jxu@northshore.org
Received: June 5, 2023
Peer-review started: June 5, 2023
First decision: August 8, 2023
Revised: August 18, 2023
Accepted: September 28, 2023
Article in press: September 28, 2023
Published online: October 21, 2023
Core Tip

Core Tip: Based on 8475 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients from a population-based biobank, we showed they have an elevated risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), with the overall proportion of incident VTE at 4.70%, similar to 4.66% observed in cancer patients. Polygenic score (PGS) is a significant predictor for VTE events, stronger than the well-known F5 factor V leiden mutation and F2 G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The overall proportion of incident VTE is 8.53% in patients at the top 10 PGS percentile. These findings highlight the importance of VTE complications in IBD patients and provide genetic tools for personalized thromboprophylaxis.